Aug/Sep 2013

Features

Love Your Gut

Subscribers Only — We’ve all become familiar with the promise of probiotics, thanks to Jamie Lee Curtis and Activia yogurt. Probiotics are now added to baby food, pizza crust, cookies and even chocolate bars. They’re also widely available as supplements. According to SPINS, a natural foods market research group, sales of probiotic foods and supplements shot up 79 percent from 2010 to 2012 (from $1.25 billion to $2.25 billion).   More...

Ticked Off

It’s an allergy ripped from the pages of a science fiction novel. A lone star tick, widespread in the southeast, mid-Atlantic and northeast regions of the United States, bites an unsuspecting subject. Four to eight weeks later, the victim starts to notice some odd reactions. There may be itching on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. There usually is a very bad night, where the person is awakened around midnight due to an outbreak of hives. There may be diarrhea, nausea, vomiting. Some people feel dizzy, their blood pressure drops, their throat begins closing up and they start going into anaphylactic shock.   More...

Hang Up Your Condiments

Subscribers Only — Navigating barbecues and other summertime events can be frustrating as food-sensitive eaters negotiate which spreads, sauces and dips are safe to eat. Fortunately, there’s no reason to settle for another naked burger or bare tortilla chip. Crafting your own allergy-friendly condiments is an easy, surefire way to enliven any menu.   More...

The Joy of Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Can homemade ice cream be allergy-friendly and good for you, too? Prepare to be amazed. Making ice cream at home with nutrient-dense ingredients and no dairy, nuts, eggs, soy or refined sugar is surprisingly fast, easy—and delicious.   More...

Life Story

Lifestyle Q&A - College Party Scene

I’m a guy in my junior year at the University of Texas, Austin. Everyone here gets what gluten-free is and I’ve managed to eat pretty well since starting school, despite having celiac disease. But after three years of navigating college life, I’m really, really, really, really tired of my friends throwing keggers. I know this is college. And sure, I bring a flask—but not only do I look weird, I’m still expected to chip in for the beer and pizza.   More...

Eva LaRue

Subscribers Only — Eva LaRue’s eight-year run playing crime scene investigator Natalia Boa Vista on CSI: Miami recently ended when the TV show was cancelled. Now the former All My Children soap star is spending more time with her daughter, Kaya, and her husband of three years, Joe Cappuccio. Living Without spoke with the actress several years ago about her soy sensitivity, discovered after her daughter, then 7 years old, developed severe skin rashes from eating soy. Here, LaRue brings us up to date on her special dietary needs.   More...

So Good

Classic Gluten-Free Southern Food

Subscribers Only — Nothing says summer fare in the South better than pulled pork, collard greens, black-eyed peas, sweet potatoes and peaches. This classic menu, recreated here with fresh, nutrient-dense ingredients and without gluten and the Big 8 food allergens, is truly the best of the South.   More...

Super Quick Gluten-Free Breads

A gluten-free cake mix is the surprise foundation for these delicious and easy-to-make breads. Quick breads are called that because they require no yeast, no kneading and no extra equipment. Using a box mix means they can be whipped up in just minutes. These recipes are guaranteed to be huge time-savers for busy cooks.   More...

Coconut Oil 101

Subscribers Only — Coconut has become a hot topic in the culinary world. It’s touted as a miracle food with the ability to cure all sorts of ailments and diseases. In today’s marketplace, you can find a range of coconut products—coconut flour, coconut milk, coconut cream, coconut aminos, coconut vinegar, coconut sugar, coconut nectar, coconut butter, coconut oil. Of these, coconut oil seems to be getting the most attention and is used the most widely. In fact, it is often a staple for those on a dairy-free diet.   More...

House Call

Allergies Q & A- Asthma Triggers, Allergic Reactions, & More!

Anaphylaxis Canada recently released Living Confidently with Food Allergy, a free handbook that gives families the tools they need to safely manage food allergies. Living Without is pleased to excerpt a few highlights here. The entire contents of this free handbook, including relevant references, can be found at AllergyHome.org and Anaphylaxis.ca.   More...

Research Roundup: Vitamin D, Food Allergy, Celiac Rash in Kids, and More!

Adequate levels of vitamin D may protect against food allergy, at least in the first year of life, according to new research from Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Australia. Infants in the study with low levels of vitamin D (less than 50 nmol/L) were three times more likely to have egg allergy and 11 times more likely to have peanut allergy than those with adequate levels (greater than 50 nmol/L). They were also ten times more likely to have multiple rather than a single food allergy.   More...

Immunoglobulins & Mushrooms, Anyone?

Subscribers Only — Immunoglobulins are immune system antibodies with the capacity to confront invading threats to your health like bacteria, viruses and allergens. Different immunoglobulins made by the white blood cells address different specific threats, similar to the way a nation keeps an army, navy and air force to protect its land, coastlines and air. Immunoglobulin A (IgA), for example, primarily resides in the fluids of the body (mucous, saliva, tears, other secretions). IgA blood levels are tested when people are screened for celiac disease.   More...

Detox Bath

Subscribers Only — When it comes to bathing, detox is the process of soaking in mineral-rich water in order to absorb vital nutrients and rid the body of built-up toxins. Increasingly popular, detox bathing is a time-honored practice that dates back to ancient Rome and Egypt. The goal is to promote healing, flexibility and overall wellness. This type of bathing is said to help reenergize a tired body, purify the system and clear the mind. Many people take a detox bath at the first sign of illness.   More...

Try it

Living Without's Favorites: Gone to Seeds

Breakfast is back, thanks to teeChia’s super-seed cereal. Six different organic seeds—chia, flax, quinoa, amaranth, ramon and pumpkin—combine with gluten-free oats and dried fruit for a grown-up porridge that’s rich in antioxidants, protein, fiber and omega-3. TeeChia offers two varieties—Cinnamon Cranberry and Blueberry Date. Both are slightly sweet without any refined sugar.   More...

Living Without's Favorites: Kid’s Delight

Have fun for lunch. Chicken Bites from Wellshire Farms are shaped like dinosaurs, just right for little hands. Not over-processed like those other chicken nuggets, these are free of nitrites, phosphates, byproducts, antibiotics, growth stimulants and MSG—and they’re certified gluten-free.   More...

Living Without's Favorites: Here’s the Beef

Hungry? In a hurry? Mama’s Meatballs from Second Helping to the rescue. These meatballs are as good as any you make from scratch—but much more convenient. Eat them without worry. They’re certified gluten-free and contain no dairy, soy, corn or nuts. No artificial colors, flavors, fillers or preservatives   More...

Living Without's Favorites: Body Fuel

Finally. A meal replacement shake that is gluten-free, hypoallergenic and tastes great. Kate Farms’ Komplete is an allergen-free food inspired by Kate, a 4 year old with cerebral palsy who was failing to thrive on prescribed replacement beverages loaded with sugar and dairy. Her parents, Richard and Michelle Laver, took things into their own hands.   More...

Read it

Living Without's Favorite Books: Bright Star

The gluten-free community has gained another star chef. Williams-Sonoma’s Kristine Kidd, who was food editor of Bon Appetit magazine for over 20 years, was recently diagnosed with celiac disease. (She had been informed she’d outgrown it when she was a child.) Now Kidd has penned Weeknight Gluten Free (Weldon Owen), a premier cookbook that is a feast for the eyes, as well as the palate.   More...

Living Without's Favorite Books: Primal Finery

If you think Paleo means eating like a caveman, Gather, The Art of Paleo Entertaining (Victory Belt Publishing) will make you think again. Here is Paleo dining made elegant by Haley Mason and Bill Staley, best-selling authors of Make It Paleo. Gather is more than a coffee-table cookbook (yes, it’s beautiful). It’s a guide to the Paleo lifestyle.   More...

Living Without's Favorite Books: Nix the Naughties

If deciphering long lists of unfamiliar ingredients taxes you and all the hype on food packages gets in your way, it’s time for Rich Food, Poor Food (Primal Blueprint). This important guide to grocery shopping by Jayson Calton, PhD, and Mira Calton, CN, cuts to the chase, mapping out the supermarket aisle by aisle so you can make the healthiest choices—and save money, too. This book is a GPS (Grocery Purchasing System) for those who sometimes feel lost and confused in this world full of food allergens and other no-no ingredients.   More...

Living Without's Favorite Books: A Real Treat

Laurie Sadowski has done it again. The author of The Allergy-Free Cook Bakes Bread now recreates your favorite desserts in The Allergy-Free Cook Bakes Cakes and Cookies (Book Publishing Company). From holiday cookies and mini-cakes to bars and biscotti, this book is packed with special treats for you and your loved ones, all without gluten, dairy, egg and soy.   More...

Food for Thought

Back to School

As I prepared my master’s thesis, a first book of poems, the hard reality of managing allergies was on my mind. So I gave myself permission to draft the Allergy Girl series. In one poem, I recalled a hive-inducing kiss from a stranger. In another, I compared anaphylaxis to being on a plane as it crashes. My readers didn’t get grossed out or bored. They were curious. I wrote for a newspaper about discovering my allergy to mango while at a party. Eventually I wrote a memoir that doubled as a cultural history of food allergies. Instead of bookstores and bars, I found myself speaking at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.   More...

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